about robots taking people's jobs

I'm not opposed to the idea of robots taking over dangerous manual jobs. I'm not even opposed to the idea of robots taking over creative or technical jobs. I'm just opposed to people blindly trying to make that happen as soon as possible, before any societal provisions are put in place for the people whose jobs will be taken.

I don't believe in meritocracy. I'm not in favor of economic or intellectual Darwinism. It assumes that only the smartest or most resourceful should survive, and it also assumes an even playing field for all involved. "If someone's manufacturing job will be taken by a robot, they should just learn the skills needed to get a better one," say people from well-off families who have never tried to master a skill while hungry, or while working a low-wage job 16 hours a day.

I'm all for robots taking our jobs, but before that, we need our society to function without jobs at all. We need to set it up so that no one needs to spend their entire life working at a place they don't really care about just to feed themselves and their families.

We need get our world to a place where no one has to work to stay alive. Once that happens, bring on the robots.

not a technocracy

Last weekend, while camping on an island full of ponies, I had a long conversation with a newfound friend who works in Washington D.C. as a lawyer and political fixer, and Joel, who's studying computer security but did his undergrad in economics and political science.

The new friend implored Joel and me to venture into roles outside of tech, not a hard sell since we're both from non-tech backgrounds. But she emphasized the fact that non-techies have no idea what's going on with technology, and that's a huge issue, especially in law and the government.

We already sort of knew this, but the bleakness with which she presented us with this information was startling. Joel and I are years away from being computer experts, but she said that decades of experience aren't a prerequisite to be a consult for some of the concepts that lawyers and lawmakers need help grasping. It just takes a few connections with the right people-- and a knack for translating technology into language that actual human beings understand.

As someone who went into tech partly to make it more accessible, it's encouraging to see that I really am filling a pressing need-- the need for techies to have actual human skills. However, it's also disconcerting to hear that our government is still largely tech-illiterate when technology now permeates everything. Entrenched systems have a lot of catching up to do.